This is the amazing story of our micro preemie, John Craig. He was born on November 30, 2005 at 24 weeks and 5 days gestation. He weighed 1 pound 8 ounces and was 12 inches long. John is a true miracle and an inspiration to all that meet him!
For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you a hope and a future.
Jeremiah 29.11

Monday, July 24, 2006

G-Tube info.

Some of you may be wondering what a G-tube is so here is some information.

Gastric feeding tube
A gastric feeding tube, or "G-tube", is a tube inserted through a small incision in the abdomen into the stomach and is used for long-term enteral nutrition. The most common type is the percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) tube. It is placed endoscopically: the patient is sedated, and an endoscope is passed through the mouth and esophagus into the stomach. The position of the endoscope can be visualized on the outside of the patient's abdomen because it contains a powerful light source. A needle is inserted through the abdomen, visualized within the stomach by the endoscope, and a suture passed through the needle is grasped by the endoscope and pulled up through the esophagus. The suture is then tied to the end PEG tube that will be external, and pulled back down through the esophagus, stomach, and out through abdominal wall. The insertion takes about 20 minutes. After the insertion, the abdominal wound must be covered with sterile dressings until it is healed (about a week). The tube is kept within the stomach by a balloon on its tip (which can be deflated to remove the tube).

Gastrostomy tubes can also be placed in "open" procedures through an incision with direct visualization of the stomach, as well as via laparoscope. Gastric tubes are suitable for long-term use: they last about six months, and can be replaced through an existing passage without an additional endoscopic procedure. The G-tube is useful where there is difficulty with swallowing because of neurologic or anatomic disorders (stroke, esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula), and to avoid the risk of aspiration pneumonia. It is also used when patients are malnourished and cannot take enough food by mouth to maintain their weight. They also can be used in "reverse" to drain stomach contents.